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20130104
20130112
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MSNBCW 22
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that and that you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, protection of minorities, its protection of women and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also, would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. you know? the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women? does it educate that half of the population? does it give them
will the taliban plal in the future of that country. and what role will the united states play after we end our combat mission? how many troops will we keep behind in afghanistan to keep that country secure if we can? jim moran is a democrat congressman from virginia and westmore is a retired army captain and author of "the other wes moore. i guess the question comes down to numbers. 66,000 troops in country right now. what should be it be five years from now. >> i think we're going to initially withdraw to 6,000 troops in 2014. i think a lot of work will be done by contractors, not u.s. troops, but we can't afford to continue spending the kind of money we're spending. you know, we have spent $557 billion up to today, half a trillion dollars, and what have we gotten for it? burma, somalia, and afghanistan are the three most corrupt nations in the world, and now almost 90% of that corruption is coming from american taxpayers' money. you'd be shocked at the amount of american taxpayers' money that's being spent over in dubai because it came in to afghanistan. this is a nation that's -- a governme
and taliban takeover. as for president karzai, he said he would like to see levels around 15,000 but today suggested numbers are less important than u.s. cooperation and supplying the them with tanks and drones. how much will it all cost? already the u.s. and allies pledged $16 billion in civilian aid and military ops on top of $642 billion the u.s. spent since 9/11 and 2,100 u.s. lives lost. let's start with kristen welker. what are you hearing came out of the meeting? >> reporter: a couple of headlines out of today's meeting. the withdrawal plans have been accelerated a bit. both announcing that u.s. troops handing over control to afghan forces this spring. that is a few months earlier than expected so that means that u.s. troops will shift their role in afghanistan. they will be taking on a role of advising, assisting and training afghan forces. president obama making it very clear, though, u.s. troops will still be in harm's way if they continue to be in the country. the big question mark remanes, how many troops are in afghanistan after 2014? today, president obama not answering that
're living right now in the united kingdom because the taliban says it would shoot her again. malala became a target after she campaigned for women in afghanistan. my friend and colleague has been covering the story since the beginning. good of you to come in on this saturday. first of all, remarkable recovery. how is she doing? >> she's doing well by all accounts. sources close to her say she's recovering well. this girl was shot in the head at point-blank range and she's only 15 years old. so by all accounts, being able to walk out of the hospital in her own two feet is a major milestone when it comes to her recovery. she's got a physical recovery to make after a long surgery and hopefully at the end of this month and then, of course, there's a psychological recovery and there's a lot of trauma when it comes to being shot by the taliban and this girl has a long road ahead of her. >> she's committed to her fight for education in pakistan. will they come back? >> it doesn't look like it right now. certainly they've been saying and pakistani officials have been saying, but they want to go ba
're expected to discuss peace talks with the taliban and future u.s. troops before karzai sits down with the president on friday. >>> a disturbing story out of russia, what was supposed to be an enjoyable adventure took a tragic turn, as a giant inflatable zorb ball with two men inside veered off course, one man was killed and the other is in serious condition. >>> off the coast of australia, a man lost control of his boat, fell out and was swimming around nearby while the boat was spinning in circle. a police craft was finally able to rescue the boater and he is reportedly doing well. >>> and the huge doomsday asteroid made a fly-by of the u.s. last night, it's more than 1,000 feet wide and could actually hit the earth in the year 2036. >>> now for a look at wall street, the dow opened the day at 13,390 after gaining 61 points on wednesday. overseas the nikkei rose 74. >>> earnings optimism returned to the street wednesday. today, we'll see how investors react to the latest data. holiday retail sales and earnings from oil giant chevron. appled closed above 700 while facebook was sp
immaturity of afghan forces alongside the continuing presence of the taliban, isn't it in our interest to walk slowly out of this conflict rather than too quickly? >> well, it may be in our national security interest to do that, martin, but there's been a great deal of anticipation that this conflict was coming to an end. we saw during the presidential campaign that they d republicans tried to make a big deal of squabbling over the details but they, too, were seeing a fairly rapid end to this, and this expedites it somewhat more quickly. so i think there's going to be a lot of crossing of fingers and hoping things don't turn into an even worse disaster there. but this had already been baked in the cake. there's no political will to stay any further. >> okay. mike, i followed much of what you have written on the subject of afghanistan, and it seems as though you feel a little more optimistic about the country. but given the endemic corruption, the harboring of pakistani terrorists along the border, the confused way that nato has pumped money into afghanistan, do we leave a nation that r
. and the taliban issued a statement saying if u.s. troops are left here they vow and promise more war and destruction. >> thanks to you. be safe, as well. the numbers being floated in terms of how many troops the u.s. might leave in afghanistan have ranged as high as 20,000. they are as low as 3,000. let's get to the war room. former chief of staff for west virginia. a republican strategist and former aid to president george h.w. bush. what do you think that we will hear from this meeting between president obama and president karzai. >> president obama i'm sure will listen to the laundry list of complaints that president karzai has. i think both are concerned about the local audience, that is to say the domestic audience. president karzai is concerned about the audience at home and president obama has to consider the bigger picture. >> chris, with the political reality is that the public wants out of afghanistan. and the political reality in afghanistan is that they want u.s. troops to leave, why, then, keep any troops in afghanistan? >> that is a really good question. i think you are
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
of the soldiers and taliban, they are ready for a withdrawal because they feel if the withdrawal happens, there will be less fighting. but many analysts say the fighting will continue. >> on a side note, real interesting, before we let you go, we don't get much face time with atia, we were talking about movies coming to afghanistan, zero dark thirty, whether it was seen there yet. girls going back to school. here in america we think all children need to be educated. women can't go to the movie theater in afghanistan. >> no, they can't. if they try to it would be a dangerous prospect. the men that go to the movie theaters, we have to remember afghanistan doesn't have a class that have jobs, many boys are going there and causing troubles. girls cannot go and bear by go out by themselves without being harassed. massive sexual harass. me ment on the streets. there are children providing for their families and treated pretty badly. >> we need to continue talking about this. thanks for being here. great to see you. as we mentioned president obama and president karzai will hold a joint news con
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
was gunned down by taliban walked out of the hospital today. she will remain in britain as she continues to recover. jts back here in the states, the cdc is recording the biggest bump of flu for an extremely rough winter. >>> a bang-up week on wall street. now, back to "hardball. >>> welcome back to "hardball." the controversial new movie "zero dark thirty" about the hunt for osama bin laden has already racked up a slew of critical praise and oscar buzz, but it's also received some real world criticism from its depiction of torture as a key element in finding bin laden. now it has sparked a senate investigation. senators dianne feinstein, carl levin, and john mccain want to know whether the cia provided misinformation to filmmakers. in a statement yesterday the three senators wrote, given the cia's cooperation with the filmmakers and the narrative's consistency with past public misstatements by former senior cia officials, the filmmakers could have been misled by information they were provided by the cia. so what are the facts about the role enhanced interrogation played in the investiga
to the taliban? and does that mean al qaeda is coming back. president karzai knows that he needs america's help right now. but he's also trying to let america know that he means business when it comes to securing his own land and having complete sovereignty from american rule and military. >> it just shows you how dmrik indicate the whole equation is. atiyyah, good to see you here. one crucial voice on afghanistan will be chuck hagel if confirmed as secretary of defense. president obama nominated him earlier this week now the white house is gearing up for a nomination fight. cleaning me is roger simon from politico. good morning. >> good morning. your new piece is titled "hagel puts country ahead of conquest." where do you see us if indeed chuck hagel is confirm as defense secretary? >> i see us heading out. hagel has wanted our forces out of afghanistan for a while now. we have accomplished our purpose there. we have met our goals. we have dispersed al qaeda, and destroyed much of our leadership. andal we're doing now is propping up a regime that is not liked by the people of afghanistan. ther
activist. in an attack that sparked global outrage, she was targeted in pakistan by taliban gunmen for speaking out in favor of education for pakistani girls. now, three months later, she's been discharged from a british hospital recovering in england. doctors plan to perform more surgery on her within the next month. we wish her well. up next, we dive into the vault not once but twice. which president began the era of helping the people and which one screwed it all up? r on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cho
and taliban and associated forces so that not only -- >> associated doing a lot of work there? >> it is. and the other thing that's doing a lot of work is substantially supported. anybody who substantially supported these forces is subject to indefinite detention which is not something that you would get if you went back and read the authorization for use and military force from 2001, which describes a narrower set of people, frankly. >> so we've actually expanded? >> legislatively, yes. in some ways, this bill was basically codifying what the lower courts have been doing. >> have allowed. >> have alouds. >> the supreme court hadn't weighed in on whether this is okay. will it? i don't know. >> let me ask you this, ben, the naacp is not an institution that's focused on national security issues, for understandable reasons but i wonder sometimes and i'm not someone that welcome i don't myself, that's not the thing i spend most of my time reading about but i wonder if when you think about this stuff, the role of an organization like naacp to weigh in on this stuff partly because of the hist
to be a resurgence and outbreak of violence in a place that's already plagued by it. the taliban this weekend vowed more of what it called war destruction if the u.s. leaves behind a residual force. that's a sobering reminder of the instability here, alex. >> i appreciate the breakdown of the numbers and what they would be doing. >>> the new headline this morning, the white house considering a broad gun control plan. i'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain relieve
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)